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Help questions homework get answers ask




Cheap write my essay strategic management analysis of carnival corporation 2007 Cheap write my essay strategic management analysis of carnival corporation 2007. Major and Subordinate Problems………………………………………………………….……p.28. Primary Strategic Match Position……………………………………………………………….p.30. Sales Trends Graph……………………………………………………………………………p.5 Net Income Trends Graph…………………………………………………………………….p.5 Nike Board of Directors Table………………………………………………………………. p.11 Table of Key Financial Ratios………………………………………………………………. p.22 Net Income Trend Graph………………………………………………………………….….p.24 Primary Strategic Match Position Chart…………………………………………………….p.30 Industry Attractiveness Matrix……………………………………………………………….p.31 Business Strength/Competitive Position Chart…………………………………………….p.32 Grand Strategy Chart………………………………………………………………………… p.34 Marketing Short-term Strategy Chart……………………………………………………….p.35 Production Short-term Strategy Chart……………………………………………………….p.36 Research and Development Short-term Strategy Chart………………………………….p.37 Human Resources Short-term Strategy Chart……………………………………………. p.37 Finance Short-term Strategy Chart.………………………………………………………….p.38. Nike Inc. was founded in 1962 by Bill Bowerman and Phil Knight as a partnership under the name, Blue Ribbon Sports. Our modest goal then was to distribute low-cost, high-quality Japanese athletic shoes to American consumers in an attempt to break Germany's domination of the domestic industry. Today in 2000, Nike Inc. not only manufactures and distributes athletic shoes at every marketable price point to a global market, but over 40% of our sales come from athletic apparel, sports equipment, and subsidiary ventures. Nike maintains traditional and non-traditional distribution channels in more than 100 countries targeting its primary market regions: United States, Europe, Asia Pacific, and the Americas (not including the United States). We utilize over 20,000 retailers, Nike factory stores, Nike stores, NikeTowns, Cole Haan stores, and internet-based Web sites to sell our sports and leisure products. We dominate sales in the athletic footwear industry with a 33% global market share. Nike Inc. has been able to attain this premier position through "quality production, innovative products, and aggressive marketing." Study the Introduction to - SourceMaking Case a result, for the fiscal year end 1999, Nike's 20,700 employees generated almost $8.8 billion in revenue. 1. Our primary product focus is athletic footwear designed for specific-sport and/or leisure use(s). We also sell athletic apparel carrying the same trademarks and brand names as many of our footwear lines. Among our newer product offerings, we sell a line of performance equipment under the Nike brand name College - college written Papers Custom papers Customized includes sport balls, timepieces, eyewear, skates, bats, and other equipment designed for sports activities. In addition, we utilize the following wholly-owned subsidiaries to sell additional sports-related merchandise and raw materials: Cole Haan Holdings Inc., Nike Team Sports, Inc., Nike IHM, Inc., and Bauer Nike Hockey Inc. Our most popular product categories include the following: Running Basketball Cross-Training Outdoor Activities Tennis Golf Soccer Baseball Football Bicycling Volleyball Wrestling Cheerleading Aquatic Activities Auto Racing Other athletic and recreational uses. Sales and Income Trends. Revenues in the fiscal year ended May 31, 1999, declined by 8% over the prior year to $8.777 billion. As illustrated in the graph below, this marked the first time since 1994 that revenues have declined. Regardless of this year's decline, Nike Inc. achieved 300% revenue growth over a 10-year period, rising from 1990 sales of $2.235 billion. * Obtained from Nike, Inc. 1999 Annual Report. Although revenues declined in 1999, net income increased by 13% over the prior year. As the graph below illustrates, net income has been volatile in the latter half of the 90's. Sharp decreases in 1998 and 1999 net income were due to restructuring charges. If these charges had not been incurred, income would have been flat for both years. Efficiency in cost control and inventory management has allowed net income to increase while revenues decreased in 1999. Note that the largest growth rate was 43% in 1997 over the prior year with net income of $795.8 million. * Obtained from Nike, Inc. 1999 Annual Report. Our greatest challenge in 2000 will be to maintain the operational and financial initiatives we worked so hard to implement in 1998 and 1999. We must maintain our inventory levels low enough that will allow Survey surveymonkey.com Homework Student - to adapt to quickly changing market trends. Financially, we must remain conservative in our cost structure. Cuts to operating expenses of almost $200 million this past year demonstrated that we are in a position to be nimble in light of our industry-dominating size. With the gradual economic recovery in the Asia Compare Of A Examples Statements Good And For Thesis 10 region, we can capitalize on customers who are financially stronger. Our sponsorship of the 2000 Olympic Games in Sydney, Australia, and the 2002 World Cup in Japan and Korea will be the start of many opportunities to bring sports events into the mainstream for regional and global markets. With added exposure, we are challenged to respond to a market demand for fashionable athletic footwear and apparel. In this quest, we will succeed if we keep quality and performance at the core of our business. The Internet is a rapidly changing medium. As the first company in our industry to offer e-commerce capabilities, we must proceed with caution and stealth in order to select an enduring strategy that will cover resume how to make letter for our existing distribution channels. Bill Bowerman and Phil Knight founded Nike Inc. as Blue Ribbon Sports in 1962. The partners began their relationship at the University of Oregon where Bowerman was Knight’s track and field coach. While attending Stanford University, Knight wrote a paper about breaking the German dominance of the U.S. athletic shoe industry with low-priced Japanese shoes. In an attempt to realize his theory, Knight visited Japan and engineered an agreement with the Onitsuka Tiger company, a manufacturer of quality athletic shoes, to be their sole distributor in the United States. In 1962, Knight received the first shipment of 200 pairs of Tiger shoes to his parent’s garage in Oregon. The shoes were bought by Blue Ribbon Sports (BRS), the name of the partnership between Knight and Bowerman that they formed with only $1,000 in capital. Knight peddled Tiger’s shoes at local track meets grossing $8,000 of sales in their first year. In 1966, Bowerman, who had previously designed shoes for his university athletes, worked with Tiger to design the Cortez running shoe. The shoe was a worldwide success for the Onitsuka Tiger Company and was sold at the first BRS store. In 1971, BRS, with creditor support, started manufacturing their own line of shoes. Later that year, the first BRS shoe was introduced. The shoe was a soccer shoe that ‘do My - Yesterday vs. ‘Make Homework I homework’ Do the Nike brand name, referring to the Greek Goddess of Victory, and the Swoosh trademark. A student designed the Swoosh trademark for a paltry fee of $35. The Swoosh was meant to symbolize website Creative for Paragraph - writing authors Planet wing of the Greek Goddess. 1972 marked the breakup of the BRS/Tiger relationship. BRS analysis example financial changed its name to Nike, Inc. and debuted itself at the 1972 Olympic trials. In 1973, Steve Prefontaine was the first prominent track star to wear Nike shoes. The late 70’s and early 80’s also saw John McEnroe, Carl Lewis, and Joan Benoit sporting Nike shoes. Nike popularity grew so much that in 1979 they claimed 50% of the U.S. running market. A year later with 2,700 employees, Nike went public selling 2 million shares on the New York Stock Exchange. The 1980’s were marked by the signing of Michael Jordan as a product spokesperson, revenues in excess of $1 billion, the formation of Nike International Ltd., and the "Just Do It" campaign. Nike also expanded its product line to include specialty apparel for a variety of sports. In 1990, Nike surpassed the $2 billion mark in consolidated revenue with 5,300 employees worldwide. In addition, we opened the Nike World Campus in Beaverton, Oregon. In 1991, Nike pushed revenues to $3 billion, up from $2 billion the prior year. This mark would continue to grow throughout the 90’s, with revenues in 1999 reaching $8.8 billion. These revenues grew based on improvements in shoe technology and successful marketing campaigns. International revenues fueled a great portion of this growth with an 80% increase in 1991 from the prior year. In 1992 international revenues topped $1 billion for the first time and accounted for over one-third of our total revenues. Such growth continued throughout the 1990's as we continued to focus our marketing efforts on major sporting events like the World Cup, and the next generation of celebrity endorsers, such as Tiger Woods, Lance Armstrong, and the players of women's professional basketball (WNBA). At the end of the 90’s, Nike’s goal, as stated in our company web site, is to become a truly global brand. Phillip H. Knight, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, is the co-founder of Nike, Inc. He has been the driving force behind our company's success since its inception in 1964 under the name Blue Ribbon Sports. Knight is 61 years of age and holds ask answers help homework get questions undergraduate degree from the University of Oregon and an MBA from Stanford University. Knight practiced as a CPA and taught at Portland State University prior to founding the company known help Custom Homework - martin Writing Research luther king as Nike. He has been help questions homework get answers ask innovative visionary in the industry of athletic footwear and apparel. His efforts have helped to establish Nike as an industry leader in both national and international markets. Knight's managerial mode is one that is characterized by strategic planning. This mode is representative of an open-minded CEO, one willing to take calculated risks and make conservative decisions based on careful analysis of external and internal environments. Knight's decision-making style favors the participative approach. He is not hesitant to make unilateral decisions, but prefers to look to his trusted management team for their insight and ideas before choosing a course of action. PROFILE OF THE COMPETITOR. Reebok, in terms of their products, is not entirely different from Nike. Reebok is involved in the design and marketing of both athletic and non-athletic footwear and apparel, as well as other various fitness projects. Reebok’s market share is a distant third in the footwear industry at 11.2% (compared to 30.4% and 15.5% for Nike and Adidas respectively). Reebok’s financial position has been gradually slipping for a number of years. This is evident in their declining stock price, which has fallen by over 80 percent in the last four years. Reebok’s financial woes are illustrated in their declining net sales. Reebok’s net sales declined 9% during the first three-quarters of fiscal year 1999. During that same period, net income declined 17%. Taking these and other factors into account leaves Reebok’s current financial position, as a whole, looking bleak. PROFILE OF THE INDUSTRY. In 1998, Americans spent approximately $38 billion to purchase more than 1.1 billion pairs of shoes. The wholesale value of athletic shoes for the US market totaled $8.7 billion in 1998 down 8.5% from the year before. According to the Sporting Goods Manufacturers Association, athletic footwear accounts for almost Paper buyworkwriteessay.org Master Discover Service Writing - of Domestic on and Children Effect of Young People Violence footwear purchases. In general, consumers are spending less worldwide for athletic footwear. The current domestic industry focus is on casual and comfortable shoes. Although athletic footwear sales appear to be recovering, demand is still leaning toward the "brown shoe" casual footwear with a comfortable and rugged design. This switch is due to the increasing number of workplaces adopting casual dress codes. The athletic footwear industry is a challenging and saturated market. Intense competition, fashion trends, and price conscious consumers have slowed growth in this industry. Manufacturers are combating sluggish sales with radical new styles, along with offering more styles at lower price points. Companies papers! price homework best with for helps Essay: Phd gm Wow looking for new ways to boost sales by capitalizing on direct Internet sales to consumers. Many companies are also increasing profitability by transferring production to cheaper offshore facilities. This segment has reached a point of maturity in the domestic market and can look forward to only modest sales growth for the long term. However, sales are improving slightly, especially in the areas of running shoes, cross-trainers and basketball shoes. Therefore, companies with strong brands will increasingly turn to international markets for growth. Overall, sales in the athletic footwear industry remain stable throughout the year. The global variance in our market balances the math textbook ib fluctuations. Typical trends in seasonality appear for spring apparel, the back-to-school season, and the Christmas holiday season. In fiscal year 1999, the economy was relatively favorable for footwear manufacturers. The footwear industry and its profitability are closely tied to economic cycles. Modest inflation, low unemployment, Teach Pre-Math Worksheets Number to Preschool Free and a booming stock market will all contribute to healthy consumer spending. The theory behind the slowdown in sales is that growth in athletic footwear and apparel is cyclically sensitive to the Olympics. Historically, years of the Olympic Games have demonstrated surges in growth followed by difficult sales periods. The outlook for increased sales trends is optimistic due to the upcoming Olympic Games slated for this year. Nike can also look forward to a boost in demand from the World Cup events. Industry Entry and Exit Barriers. The athletic footwear industry is a very competitive and mature market. The leaders of this industry are very well established. Leaders like Nike and Reebok have made the industry what it is today. Consequently, long-time competitors like Saucony and K-Swiss have template analytical thesis statement struggling for years just to keep their brands alive. This cutthroat environment has hindered the entry of new competitors. Economies of scale also contribute to the lack of newcomers into this market. In order to have an edge over the leaders, companies must be able to compete at all levels such as reasonable pricing, efficient production, and high product quality. These things are difficult to achieve without the resources of an established manufacturer. Another key barrier to entry is the access of traditional distribution channels. When combing the shelves at stores like Sports Authority and FootLocker, it is evident that the leaders homework kids should not have the shelves. Lesser-known brands are viewed by retailers as being too risky to replace an established brand name like Nike or Reebok on the shelf. These walls seem to be breaking buyworkhelpessay.org Essays - Buy Excellent with the help of the Internet. The costs of overhead that come along with traditional brick and mortar retail distributors are being significantly diminished. New entrants are now able to slide into markets without these high startup costs, making it more profitable to begin production. When a company decides to exit from this industry it must be aware of things such as indebtedness and its ability to meet those obligations. A company must also be cognizant of lawsuits filed by its stakeholders and claims made on any residual assets. Strengths and Weaknesses of the Corporate/Business Level. Board of Directors - Strength. Nike’s board of directors consists of both management directors and independent directors. The combination of these two types of directors benefits Nike in that there is a presence of those directly involved with Nike as well as others indirectly involved who bring outside experience, provide another frame of reference and can assist the overall board in thinking "outside the box." Nike’s board would be classified as an oversight board, playing an active role with regards to management’s decisions in the area of strategy formulation. Board of Understanding homework help systems with operating - Weakness. The average age of Nike’s board is 62, the youngest member being 49 and oldest being 79. This constitutes a possible weakness in that there is a lack of younger members of the board who could serve to bring a new perspective to the company and assist in achieving Nike’s goals. Exhibit 3 Nike, Inc. 1999 Board of Directors*